Tag Archives: 10-13-2010

Haas-Martens’ connection to citizens runs deep

Sandy Haas-Martens, 63, has been a retired banker for 15 years.

“But I’m too young to sit at home and watch soap operas and eat bonbons,” she said.

And Haas-Martens is so connected to her community it only makes sense she’s running for a sixth consecutive term on Holmes Beach City Commission.

She’s held elected office on the Island since 1992 and has run many other campaigns,

Haas-Martens spent 28 years as a bank manager and officer, 26 of which were on Holmes Beach.

In 1969, at 22 years old, she came to the Island to work as the main teller at Island Bank, now a Wachovia, and First Federal Savings Loan in Manatee County.

“The Island people always have been good to me,” Haas-Martens said. “I was their banker and I try to give back because if the Island people didn’t like me, when I was a banker, I wouldn’t have been there as long as I had. And so I went from one bank to another.”

Haas-Martens said her banking background and involvement with citizens has made her deeply aware of issues Island citizens may be facing. And she also is experienced at dealing with budgets.

Haas-Martens remains involved in the community. She has been involved with the Manatee County 4-H Foundation board since 1999, the board of intergovernmental relations committee for the Florida League of Cities, Take Stock in Children, Manatee School District programs, Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island, Manatee County Tourist Development Council. She also is the Island liaison to the county’s emergency operation center.

Haas-Martens said each citizen may have some sort of complaint about how the city is run.

“They want to have better traffic in the winter, but it’s tourist season so what are you going to do?” she said.

Haas-Martens said she thinks citizens are happy how the budget has been handled. For this fiscal year, the budget included no tax increase.

“Unfortunately, there’s only so much we can do about the economy,” she said. “We’re at the low end of the totem pole.”

Besides her work in multiple local and state programs, Haas-Martens enjoys reading, embroidery and making blankets.

“I still wake up and walk for 30 minutes, or mow and do yard work,” she said. “Or take care of other people’s lawns. I go home after a walk and have breakfast and read the paper. If I don’t have to be at a meeting, sometimes early, before I get going, I get a crossword done in the morning. Or (a) jumble.”

Then, she goes to work on the Holmes Beach improvements she’s so proud of, such as canal dredging, street paving and drainage.

“I enjoy what I do,” she said. “I enjoy working with the staff and working with the citizens and being involved.”

Biography:
RESIDENCY:  464 63rd St., Holmes Beach
OCCUPATION: Retired savings and loan/banking industry after 28 years.
OFFICE SOUGHT: Holmes Beach City Commission seat.
FAMILY: Widowed, eldest of 12 children.
INTERESTS: City government, 4-H, outdoors.
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: City commission, Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island, Manatee County 4-H Foundation, Take Stock in Children board, Great Outdoors Conservancy, Island Rescue, chamber of commerce.
CAMPAIGN MONETARY CONTRIBUTIONS (as of Sept. 15): $1,725.
QUOTE TO LIVE BY: NA.
CAMPAIGN MOTTO: “Stable city government.”

Questions:
Commission chair seeks return to dais

An Islander Q & A with Sandy Haas-Martens, who is seeking re-election to the Holmes Beach City Commission Nov. 2.
The Islander: Why did you decide to run for office in November?
Sandy Haas-Martens: To continue to give back to the citizens who supported me during my 28 years of my business career. Plus, I have the time and interest to devote to city business.

The Islander: What are your qualifications for this office?
SHM: I’ve served on the city commission since March 1998 and am the current deputy mayor/commission chair. I’m on the Manatee County Tourist Development Council, the Florida League of Cities Intergovernmental Relations Committee, the city liaison to the Manasota League of Cities, a board member of numerous groups, a former fire district commissioner and a former president of the Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce.

The Islander: What are the three top goals/positions in your platform?
SHM: To continue to bring the stable government that the citizens have come to expect from elected officials and to deal honestly and professionally in handling the finances and policies for the city.

The Islander: What is your understanding of Florida’s Sunshine/Public Records laws?
SHM: Two or more elected officials may not discuss any subject that could come before their board/commission outside of an open meeting.

The Islander: From time to time there is talk of consolidating local governments and/or local services. How do you feel about consolidation?
SHM: At the moment, I can’t see this happening. I also fail to see a monetary benefit to the citizens of Holmes Beach.

The Islander: Characterize the direction of the locality. Right track? Off track? Wrong track? Explain.
SHM: Right track. We are working with citizens in trying to resolve issues they bring to us.

The Islander: Why should voters cast their ballot for you over your opponent?
SHM: Experience.

The Islander: What is the most significant issue facing the electorate at this time? How will you handle that issue?
SHM: Unfunded mandates imposed on the city by the state and federal governments. We elected officials need to work with our local legislative delegation by conveying our citizens’ wants and needs. We need to impress upon the legislators that when they come up with the measures and orders, they also need to provide the funding.

The Islander: Local governments are beginning a new fiscal year. What is your view of the local budget/tax situation? And how do you approach government finances?
SHM: We live within our means — just like I do with my personal finances.

The Islander: Is there a promise you want to make to voters?
SHM: I will continue to bring the stable government the citizens have come to expect from their elected officials.

Rigney wants to keep WMFR rolling

John Rigney says he’s certified in just about everything related to fire rescue, which is one of the reasons he said he should be elected to his fourth term at West Manatee Fire Rescue.

Rigney, 52, is a fire inspector at North River Fire District in Palmetto. He worked as a firefighter at the Longboat Key Fire Department for 24 years and served almost four years for in Bradenton Fire Department.

Rigney, who is looking for his seventh and eight years as a WMFR commissioner, wants to keep doing what he says is his expertise – all things related to fire service.

“I enjoy working with the department,” Rigney said. “I’ve been in the fire service since 1980, and I feel comfortable in knowing all the aspects of fire service.”

Rigney said he is certified as a firefighter EMT, fire inspector, fire officer, pump operator, fire instructor and has a fire science degree.

He also has owned Rigney Plumbing for 27 years.

Rigney said being open minded is just one of the aspects that makes for overseeing an effective fire department.

“You have to have a vision of the future, but you also have to make sure you’re not outspending your budgets and make sure you just keep up on the latest statutes out there.”

Rigney said he does not think much change is necessary at WMFR.

“Mainly I want to make sure things keep moving forward,” Rigney said. “We’ve accomplished a lot the last six years. We’re working on making sure to stay with the public education program, and training programs, so they’re not getting cut. That way guys can still go out there and do the right thing with the public.”

Rigney said it all comes down to protecting the public.

“I enjoy keeping our district within the budget,” he said, “and providing the best service we can.”

Ricci backed by business experience

It’s his businesses sense, including knowledge of how to stretch a dollar, that Scott Ricci says makes him a good candidate for the West Manatee Fire Rescue District commission.

Ricci, 66, has lived in Holmes Beach 16 years. But it’s the experience he gained from two businesses away from the Island that he says would help him make the district an efficient one if he were elected Nov. 2.

Ricci said his last career before retirement was at Woodlands Golf Course in Ellenton, which he designed and owned for seven years, until selling the property in 2005. “It was sold at the height of this development craze,” Ricci said. “Unfortunately, the folks who bought it, bought it at exactly the wrong time.”
But exactly the right time for Ricci.

“I think luck had something to do with it,” he said.

Ricci said he learned how to get the most out of a dollar in Chesterfield, N.H., where he founded Chesterfield Cable Vision in 1972 and sold it in 1988.

“It was never going to be much more than a reception service in that small town,” Ricci said. “Then along came HBO and ESPN and Ted Turner and changed cable TV from a reception service to something that made a lot more sense.”

At the Spofford Fire Department in New Hampshire, Ricci said he was a volunteer firefighter for 13 years and a Spofford Fire Department commissioner for six years.

“But that experience doesn’t really translate into what I’d be doing (at WMFR),” Ricci said. “We had a $50,000 budget, and they have a $5.5 million budget.”

What Ricci said would translate into making him an effective WMFR commissioner is the experience from his two businesses.

“In both cases, I was, by most standards, under-capitalized,” Ricci said. “So it was about finding ways to stretch a dollar and work within a tight budget. And I made both businesses successful. I think that’s a useful attribute even to something that has taxing authority.”

But Ricci said he has not yet determined if any changes are needed in the WMFR district.

“I’m on the outside looking in,” Ricci said. “I’m sure there are improvements that could be made. I’m real fiscally conservative. I’m sure there’s a way tax dollars could be saved, but without being involved in the operation, I really would be hesitate to pinpoint everything.”

And he needs something to do.

“Frankly, I’m bored to tears sitting around and not doing anything,” Ricci said. “I’m in a financial position that I really don’t have to generate any income and I think I can help with the fire district.”

Biography:
RESIDENCY: Holmes Beach, 16 years.
OCCUPATION: Retired.
OFFICE SOUGHT: West Manatee Fire Rescue District Commissioner, Seat No. 2.
FAMILY: Wife Anne, four children, eight grandchildren, one great-granddaughter.
INTERESTS: Boating/fishing, golf, music, cooking, the Rays and sports in general.
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT:  I was very involved in our community of Spofford, N.H., while we lived there, but constructing and running the Woodlands Golf Course after moving to Florida didn’t leave me time to be involved in much of anything outside of work. That chapter of my life is now behind me, and running for this position is an attempt at becoming more involved in the west Bradenton and Anna Maria Island communities.
CAMPAIGN MONETARY CONTRIBUTIONS (as of Sept. 15): None.
QUOTE TO LIVE BY: “I try not to do anything that will keep me awake at night.  Please note that I don’t always succeed.”
CAMPAIGN MOTTO: “It’s time for new blood in the West Manatee Fire District board room.”

Questions:
An Islander Q&A with Scott Ricci, seeking election to the West Manatee Fire Rescue District commission in the Nov. 2 general election.

The Islander:  Why did you decide to run for office in November?
Scott Ricci: It’s time for new blood in the West Manatee Fire District board room.

The Islander: What are your qualifications for this office?
SR: I’m a successful businessman, a volunteer firefighter for 10-plus years; fire commissioner in the New Hampshire town we lived in for four years; chair of that group for the last two years. I was a member and chair of the Chesterfield, N.H., Planning Board for a total of eight years. Note that planning boards in New Hampshire are judicial boards with enforcement powers. I’m a fiscal conservative in my business and personal life and can work within a budget.

The Islander: What are the three top goals/positions in your platform?
SR: I feel that the district could use some outside input into the process by which policy and decisions are made.

The Islander: What is your understanding of Florida’s Sunshine/Public Records laws?
SR: I’ve read articles and some of the statutes and I’ve watched videos by the attorney general’s office and have what I think is a pretty good feel for the basic tenets of these laws.

The Islander: From time to time there is talk of consolidating local governments and/or local services. How do you feel about consolidation?
SR: Ultimately I’d like to explore the idea of consolidating some or all of the 10 fire departments serving Manatee County. The potential for savings in dollars and improved service to the county is huge, but it’ll be a hard sell.

The Islander: Characterize the direction of the locality. Right track? Off track? Wrong track? Explain.
SR: As right as I can hope for. It’s constantly changing, most of the time for the better. You can’t go back!

The Islander: Why should voters cast their ballot for you over your opponent?
SR: I’ll be a set of budget-minded fresh eyes on that board. I feel that I have a lot to offer.

The Islander: What is the most significant issue facing the electorate at this time? How will you handle that issue?
SR: The short-term issue might be the public’s perception of this fire department. I’ll try to help the department/district save tax dollars and help them educate citizens about their roll in the community.

The Islander: Local governments are beginning a new fiscal year. What is your view of the local budget/tax situation? And how do you approach government finances?
SR: Until I know a lot more, I don’t have an opinion.

The Islander: Is there a promise you want to make to voters?
SR: All that I can promise is that I’ll do my best to save tax dollars while not compromising the fine performance of this department.

Mulyck relies versatile background

Mike Mulyck believes his background in the telecommunications industry, including 15 years as a safety and risk manager and as a volunteer firefighter, in St. Paul, Minn., make him a strong candidate for West Manatee Fire Rescue.

“I just think my background is helpful and I look at it as volunteering my services to the city I live in,” Mulyck said.

Mulyck retired and moved from St. Paul, Minn. to Anna Maria in 1998.

In 1999, he was appointed to the board of commissioners of the Anna Maria Fire District. With the merging of the Anna Maria and Westside districts in 2000, his seat was eliminated and he was appointed to the pension board.

In November 2000, Mulyck was appointed to fill a West Manatee Fire Rescue Board of Commissioners vacancy and then was elected in 2002 and 2006.

Mulyck believes he has been instrumental in the development of the district’s safety program. He serves as the board representative to the safety committee and participated in development of a long-term strategic plan. He also has attended various educational seminars relating to fire service.

Finally, Mulyck was chairman of the board from 2006 to 2008.

Mulyck does not believe there is a problem with wasteful spending in the district.

“We are well within the limits set by the state,” Mulyck said. “We are well below the allowable rate. We just are going to have challenges like anticipating a two-fold increase in health care costs.”

Mulyck anticipates other difficulties.

“When your budgets are diminishing and your costs are going up,” he said, “it’s difficult.”

Biography:
RESIDENCY: Anna Maria.
OCCUPATION: Retired safety and risk manager, telecommunications industry.
OFFICE SOUGHT: West Manatee Fire Rescue District commissioner.
FAMILY: Married, two children, two grandchildren.
INTERESTS: Woodworking, fishing, baseball, NASCAR.
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT:  Active member, Gloria Dei Lutheran Church.
CAMPAIGN MONETARY CONTRIBUTIONS (as of Sept. 15): None.
QUOTE TO LIVE BY: No answer.
CAMPAIGN MOTTO: No answer.

Questions:
An Islander Q&A with Mike Mulyck, seeking re-election to the West Manatee Fire Rescue District commission in the Nov. 2 general election.
The Islander: Why did you decide to run for office in November?
Mike Mulyck: I am interested in using my background and experience in safety and risk management, city government and fire service to serve my community

The Islander: What are your qualifications for this office?
MM: In addition to having expertise in occupational health and safety, I have dealt with managing public services in a cost-effective manner as a city councilman. I have been a part of fire and rescue service 18 years as a volunteer. I am a homeowner and taxpayer in the district and have served on the WMFR board 10 years.

The Islander: What are the three top goals/positions in your platform?
MM: First, to provide effective, professional fire and rescue service to homes, businesses and visitors in the fire district.
Second, to recruit and retain well-trained professional firefighters and officers, including women and minorities in a safe-working environment.
Third, to keep the cost of fire and rescue services at the lowest level possible without compromising service.

The Islander: What is your understanding of Florida’s Sunshine/Public Records laws?
MM: All meetings between elected officials must be public. No private communication related to WMFR is permitted between members of the board. If I have any questions, I refer to the publication “A Pocket Guide to Florida’s Government-In-The-Sunshine Laws.”

The Islander: From time to time there is talk of consolidating local governments and/or local services. How do you feel about consolidation?
MM: I have participated in the consolidation of two fire districts and discussions about further consolidations. If the potential for positive outcome outweighs the potential for negative outcomes, I would be in favor of consolidation.

The Islander: Characterize the direction of the locality. Right track? Off track? Wrong track? Explain.
MM: WMFR makes every effort to keep on track through the involvement of citizens on advisory committees when significant decisions must be made. The district engages community stakeholders in the strategic-planning process.  Public hearings are held when finalizing the budget, which, when adopted by the commissioners, is strictly adhered to. 

The Islander: Why should voters cast their ballot for you over your opponent?
MM: I am very familiar with the operations of the fire and rescue services of WMFR. To increase my ability to find solutions to the problems it faces, I have attended fire service seminars. I am actively involved in implementation of a cost-effective strategy for moving the department into the future.

The Islander: What is the most significant issue facing the electorate at this time? How will you handle that issue?
MM: The challenge before the board is to continue to provide services that comply with state and federal regulations and home/business insurance requirements, while financial resources decline. Maintaining and/or improving the quality of fire and rescue services must be done within the confines of the resources available.

The Islander: Local governments are beginning a new fiscal year. What is your view of the local budget/tax situation? And how do you approach government finances?
MM: WMFR is supported through property assessments, not ad valorem taxes. In 2010, the assessed rate is well below the allowable rate. Keeping in mind that costs, for example for healthcare, are increasing, my view is that WMFR’s board should continue efforts to keep this rate as low as possible.
I approach the use of public funds with the same caution and concern I approach the use of my own funds.

The Islander: Is there a promise you want to make to voters?
MM: I will continue to work to ensure the provision of effective efficient fire and rescue services.

Carleton: change is crucial

Michael Carleton wants a chance to inform the public about what he calls an unbelievable amount of wasteful spending by the West Manatee Fire Rescue district.

And he’s asking to be voted in as a WMFR commissioner Nov. 2 so he can begin to turn around a problem with public safety that he said has “become a huge and expensive disease that needs to be corrected.”

Carleton, a 49-year-old Holmes Beach resident and businessman, wants to consolidate government. His motto is, “Lowering tax burdens, but not lowering quality of service.”

Carleton said he does not want to lay off firefighters, but he would like to consolidate Manatee County fire departments and implement a spending freeze.

“When we’re in this economic downturn and you see what these (WMFR employees) are making, it’s an unbelievable amount of money,” he said.

Carleton said he would like to see more volunteer firefighters.

“Ten years ago we had that,” he said. “And what was wrong with that?”

Carleton owns Commercial Communication, a Holmes Beach company that installs communications equipment such as two-way radios.

“All the fire departments and police departments all use commercial equipment,” he said. “My whole life I’ve dealt with police departments, sheriff departments, EMS, putting commercial communications in, and I know the money side of how this operates. And I know plenty of ways to save money, money than can be cut.”

Carleton said he is not a former firefighter. But what the WMFR commission needs, he said, is a professional businessman who knows how to handle a budget.

On another matter, someone who speaks at a WMFR public meeting is allowed 3 minutes during public comments. Carleton said it is not fair to limit speaking time. If he is elected, he said he would be willing to stay at a meeting for as long as it takes to give each speaker at least 15 minutes.

“If a citizen wants to come in and speak with us, they should be allowed to be heard,” he said.

Carleton said it is crucial for voters to make a change at WMFR.

“It might take 5-10 years to turn this around,” Carleton said. “We’re we’re going to turn it around.”

Biography:
RESIDENCY: Nine years.
OCCUPATION: Self-employed.
OFFICE SOUGHT: West Manatee Fire District commission seat.
FAMILY: Wife, daughter.
INTERESTS: Offshore fishing, hunting and camping.
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: None yet.
CAMPAIGN MONETARY CONTRIBUTIONS (as of Sept. 15): None.
QUOTE TO LIVE BY: NA
CAMPAIGN MOTTO: “Lower taxes, but maintain quality service.”

Questions:
An Islander Q&A with Michael Carleton, seeking election to the West Manatee Fire Rescue District commission in the Nov. 2 general election.
The Islander: Why did you decide to run for office in November?
Michael Carlton: A good friend is running and suggested I do the same. I feel the same way about runaway spending and taxes.
The Islander: What are your qualifications for this office?
MC: NA
The Islander: What are the three top goals/positions in your platform?
MC: To stop spending, lower tax burdens, maintain quality service.
The Islander: What is your understanding of Florida’s Sunshine/Public Records laws?
MC: To keep everything open. No closed doors.
The Islander: From time to time there is talk of consolidating local governments and/or local services. How do you feel about consolidation?
MC: One-hundred percent for consolidation.
The Islander:  Characterize the direction of the district. Right track? Off-track? Wrong track? Explain.
MC: NA
The Islander: Why should voters cast their ballot for you over your opponent?
MC: NA
The Islander: What is the most significant issue facing the electorate at this time? How will you handle that issue?
MC: The economy. Lower the tax burden on all citizens.
The Islander: Local governments are beginning a new fiscal year. What is your view of the local budget/tax situation? And how do you approach government finances?
MC: I think we need to consolidate all local governments and go back to when volunteerism was the best and most efficient way to do things. Public safety has become a huge and expensive disease that needs to be corrected.
The Islander: Is there a promise you want to make to voters?
MC: I will do my honest best to lower your tax burdens and promote cost-effective ways to continue quality service.

Tyler calls for consolidation

Larry Tyler has 13 years of experience on the West Manatee Fire Rescue District board of commissioners and 10 years of fire experience in Beloit, Wis.

He believes experience matters and makes him an ideal candidate for another term as a WMFR commissioner.

“I love the fire service,” said Tyler, a 74-year-old resident of Cortez, where he has lived for 26 years.

He started Tyler’s ice cream shop in Cortez in 1984 and sold the business in 1996.

Tyler believes in countywide fire and EMS consolidation. He said he would like a situation where a paramedic could be on a fire truck instead of having ambulances run along with a fire truck on each emergency call. “If you tied the two together,” Tyler said, “you could have more people as firefighters.”

Tyler said that’s what the Beloit fire department did. “We eventually merged them and to this day they run an ambulance or carriage, but at least they are firefighter paramedics. So they’re firefighters as well,” he said.

Tyler said such a merger would allow four people to be on an engine. “I also think that would help the paramedic because if they are at the station or in the area, they can be off in another area and still operate as a firefighter,” he said.

Tyler believes there may be a misconception that firefighting isn’t dangerous.

“These people do put their lives on the line,” he said. “You never know what’s going to happen. It’s not like New York City, but today you’ve got more flammable products in the building. More toxins come off the material than it used to, so it’s more dangerous to contain a fire.”

Tyler is the past president of Manatee County Fire Commissioners Association, Manatee PC Users Group and the Florida Association of Computer User Groups.

He also was a past director and treasurer of the Anna Maria Island Chamber of Commerce.

His campaign motto is: “Provide the best service for the most reasonable dollar.”

Biography:
RESIDENCY: 9604 Cortez Road W., Bradenton.
OCCUPATION: Semi-retired.
OFFICE SOUGHT: West Manatee Fire District, Seat No. 3.
FAMILY: Married, wife Geri; five children, 12 grandchildren, three great-grandchildren.
INTERESTS: Golf, wood crafts.
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: Manatee Fire Commissioners Association, computer users group.
CAMPAIGN MONETARY CONTRIBUTIONS (as of Sept. 15): None.
QUOTE TO LIVE BY: “Always be positive.”
CAMPAIGN MOTTO: “Provide the best service for the most reasonable dollar.”

Questions:
WMFR commissioner seeks re-election
An Islander Q&A with Larry Tyler, seeking re-election to the West Manatee Fire Rescue District commission in the Nov. 2 general election.

The Islander: Why did you decide to run for office in November?

Larry Tyler: As an incumbent in the fire district, I advocate continuing to provide the best possible service at a most reasonable and effective cost.

The Islander: What are your qualifications for this office?

LT: Ten years as human resource director and labor negotiator of fire and police, along with five other unions. I served 13 years on this fire district commission, holding positions as chairman and secretary-treasurer.

The Islander: What are the three top goals/positions in your platform?

LT: To continue to provide the best possible service for the most reasonable dollar. To Maintain the best fire prevention to employers and residents. To have the highest trained personnel for saving lives and property.

The Islander: What is your understanding of Florida’s Sunshine/Public Records laws?

LT: Very well.

The Islander: From time to time there is talk of consolidating local governments and/or local services. How do you feel about consolidation?

LT: I believe in fire and EMS countywide consolidation. This is an ongoing position since 2001. Some district have worked together to establish functional agreements, for example, testing new hires, training etc., but this is an inevitable timetable to happen.

The Islander:  Characterize the direction of the district. Right track? Off-track? Wrong track? Explain.

LT: I believe it is the right track. Services are at the best possible response, given the layout of the district. The ISO rating (fire insurance for the home owner) is at a great rate. And it is possible that we may be able to lower the rating which will give the homeowner a better insurance rating.

The Islander: Why should voters cast their ballot for you over your opponent?

LT: Experience of 13 years in this district and 10 years of fire experience with a city in Wisconsin the size of Bradenton.

The Islander: What is the most significant issue facing the electorate at this time? How will you handle that issue?

LT: Taxes. Attempting to keep costs at reasonable level and not sacrifice the quality of services.

The Islander: Local governments are beginning a new fiscal year. What is your view of the local budget/tax situation? And how do you approach government finances?

LT: Our tax rate is one of the lowest in the county and yet the level of service is one of the best. Cautiously and economically sound for the taxpayer.

The Islander: Is there a promise you want to make to voters?

LT: I will continue to do my best to provide the best service at the most reasonable costs.

Sports – 10-13-2010

AMICC soccer division standings tighten

It was another exciting week of soccer at the Anna Maria Island Community Center. Aside from Division III where undefeated Fran Maxon Real Estate holds a 9-point cumulative lead in the standings, each of the other divisions are too close to call. The Premier Division is really tight as all three teams are tied with 2-2 records, while Division I has Mike Norman Realty and Autoway Ford tied for first with 3-1 records.

Division III also has a good battle for the top spot in the standings going with Sparks Steel Art holding a 1-point lead over Southern Greens in the standings. Three points back in third place is Wash Family Construction and, while Mr. Bones is technically in last place, it is only 5 points back. And Bones defeated first place Sparks Steel Art  4-3 Oct. 6.

Sparks bounced back with a 4-1 victory over Wash Oct. 8 that was a lot closer than the score sounds.

After a nice weaving run through the defense, Dylan Joseph beat WFC goalie Joe Rogers to give Sparks a 1-0 lead midway through the first half. WFC came back to put some pressure on the Sparks defense, but Brooke Capperalli, Maya Sapienza, Danielle Capperalli, Olivia Glavan and Sullivan Ferreira were up to the task.

WFC’s best chance to score in the half came when Nico Calleja found some space up the left side and toe-poked a rocket that Sparks goalie Cameron Pasco managed to block, but then couldn’t hold. The ball rolled right back to Calleja, who shot again, this time beating Pasco, but Ferreira came across and cleared the ball off the goal line to preserve Sparks’ 1-0 lead.

Sparks Steel Art spent the remainder of the half on offense and peppered WFC goalie Joe Rogers with shots, but he made several quality saves to keep WFC within a goal as the half came to a close.

The second half was a different story as Joseph notched another goal and Tyler Yavalar scored twice to break the game open on the way to a 4-1 victory. Gavin Sentman notched the lone goal for WFC.

In other Division II action, Southern Greens was able to pace Sparks thanks to a 2-1 victory over Mr. Bones Oct. 8. Michael Latimer and Aiden Grumley each scored a goal for Southern Greens in the victory. Ben Connors scored the lone goal for Bones.

Mr. Bones scored a huge victory over first-place Sparks 4-3 Oct. 6 behind a hat trick from Leo Rose. Ben Connors added a single goal for Bones in the victory. Joseph also had a hat trick.

The first Division II match of the week saw the ages 10-11 Wash team roll past Southern Greens by a 4-1 score Oct. 4. Sentman and Calleja scored two goals apiece to lead WFC in the victory. Reese Helvey scored the lone goal for Southern Greens.

Fran Maxon Realty stayed unbeaten in Division III with a pair of victories last week. On Oct. 8, they shut out Connie’s Landscaping 4-0 behind three goals from Josh Class and one goal from Sean Quattromani.

On Oct. 6, Maxon rolled past Jessie’s Island Store by a 6-1 score as Taro de Haan and Josh Class scored two goals apiece. Also scoring for Maxon were Allie Connelly and Quattromani. William Bernet notched the lone goal for Jessie’s.

Mike Norman Realty and Autoway Ford kept pace with each other in Division I with victories over The Gathering Place. Autoway Ford rolled to a 3-0 win Oct. 6 behind a pair of goals from Neil Carper and one goal from Sydney Cornell.

Mike Norman defeated The Gathering Place 3-1 on Oct. 5 behind a pair of goals from Morgan Greig and one goal from Michael Duffman. The Gathering Place was led by Kieran Grumley’s single goal.

West Coast Surf Shop made a huge move in the Premier Division, up from last place to a tie for first with a pair of wins that saw them tally 19 goals.

On Oct. 5, the Surf Shop lambasted Wash Family Construction 10-2 behind five goals from Chandler Hardy. Helio Gomez added four goals, while JT Goode finished with one goal in the victory.

Austin Wash scored two goals to lead WFC.

The Surf Shop won a 9-8 shootout over Beach Bistro Oct. 4 behind six goals from Gomez. Hardy added two goals and Goode notched one goal in the victory. The Bistro received four goals apiece from Julius Gomes and Phillip Biddulph.

The adult league is under way and so far in the “experienced” division, it was reported that Greg Ross split the uprights on a penalty kick during Oct. 7 action.

Sarasota Veterinary Emergency Hospital (SVEH) remained undefeated and on top of the standings thanks to a 4-2 victory over The Fish Hole. Paul Hayward led the way with two goals, while Danielle Moore and Kris Yavalar each notched one goal in the victory. Ryan Moss and Josh Sato led The Fish Hole with a goal apiece in the loss.

Back Alley edged Ross Built 2-1 in the second game of the evening. Eri Vogel and Justin Noyes scored goals for Back Alley, while Teddy Louloudes notched the lone goal for Ross Built in the loss.

Beach to Bay Construction fell 4-2 to the Sun behind a pair of goals form Damir Glavan and single goals from Zoran Kolega and Ryan Hogan. Enrico Beissert led Beach to Bay with two goals in the loss.

Horseshoe news

Only two teams emerged from pool play during Oct. 9 horseshoe action at the Anna Maria City Hall pits and were left to battle for the title. Jeff Moore and Sam Samuels outlasted Hank Huyghe and Debbie Rhodes 21-19 in a barn burner.

Only two teams came out of pool play Oct. 6, pitting Hank Huyghe and Barb Dudlet against Jerry Martinek and Ron Pepka. Martinek broke open a close match with a six-pack, double ringer on the way to 22-11 victory.

Play gets under way at 9 a.m. every Wednesday and Saturday at the Anna Maria City Hall pits. Warm ups begin at 8:45 a.m. followed by random team selection. There is no charge to play and everyone is welcome.

Key Royale Club news

The men and women of the Key Royale Club got together Oct. 8 for a nine-hole, throw-out-the-two-worst-holes golf game. The team of Terry Westby, Fred Meyer, Ron Robinson and Chet

Hutton combined to card a 93 to take first place. One shot back in second place was the team of Jane Winegarden, Pam Alvord, Earl Huntzinger and Matt Behan.

The men played an 18-hole, individual-low-net game Oct. 6. Jim Thorton carded a 2-under-par 62 to edge a trio of golfers in second place, Dennis Schavey, Jim McVicar and Vince Mercadante, all at 63.

The women of the Key Royale Club played a nine-hole, individual-low-net golf match Oct. 5. Penny Williams took first place in Flight A with an even-par 32. Second place saw Mary Selby and Sue Hookem card matching 33s.

Terry Westby carded a 4-under-par 28 to take first place in Flight B, one shot ahead of second-place finisher Sue Wheeler.

The men played a best-ball-of-foursome match Oct. 4 with the team of Don Ledford, Bob Jorgensen and Chris Collins taking first place with a 21. Jim Finn, Jerry Brown, Fred Meyer and Carl

Wencker combined for a 24 to tie the team of Jim Dunn, Chuck Reed and Dennis Schavey for second place.

AMICC soccer league standings
Team    Won    Lost    Tie    Pts.
Division III (ages 8-9)
Maxon    4    0    0    12
Jessie’s    1    3    0    3
Connie’s    1    3    0    3

Division II (ages 10-11)
Sparks    3    1    2    11
Southern    3    2    1    10
WFC    2    3    1    7
Mr. Bones    2    4    0    6

Division I (ages 12-13)
Autoway    3    1    0    9
Norman    3    1    0    9
Gathering     0    4    0    0

Premier Division (ages 14-17)
WFC    2    2    0    6
Bistro    2    2    0    6
Surf Shop    2    2    0    6

Adult Division
SVEH    2    0    0    6
Sun    1    0    1    4
Back Alley    1    0    1    4
Fish Hole    1    1    0    3
Ross Built    0    2    0    0
B-to-B    0    2    0    0

AMICC soccer league schedule
Date    Time    Teams
Instructional Division (Ages 4-5)
Oct. 13    6 p.m.    Lapensee vs. Isl. Dental
Oct. 13    6:30 p.m.    A&E vs. W.C. Air

Instructional Division (Ages 6-7)
Oct. 13    7 p.m.    IRE vs. Isl. Pest
Oct. 18    6 p.m.    LPAC vs. Dojo Ath.
Oct. 18    7 p.m.    Beach Bums  Vs. Isl. Pest

Division III (Ages 8-9)
Oct. 13    5:30 p.m.    Jessie’s vs. Connie’s

Division II (Ages 10-11)
Oct. 13    6:30 p.m.    Southern vs. Sparks \
Oct. 18    7 p.m.    Southern vs. Mr. Bones

Division I (Ages 12-13)
Oct. 6    7:30 p.m.    Ford vs. Norman

Premier Division (Ages 14-17)
Oct. 18    7:30 p.m.    Bistro vs. Surf Shop

Adult Division
Oct. 14    6 p.m.    Fish Hole vs. Back Alley
Oct. 14    7:20 p.m.    Sun vs. Ross Built
Oct. 14    8:40 p.m.    BTBC vs. SVEH

Island police blotter – 10-13-2010

Anna Maria

Oct. 6, 100 block of Park Avenue, information. Complainant reported someone removed an air compressor for the outside of a residence.

Oct. 7, 100 block of Hammock Ave., grand theft. The complainant reported he left more than $10,000 worth of jewelry on a front table in the home and woke up to find all the jewelry missing.

Bradenton Beach

No new reports.

Holmes Beach

Oct. 5, 300 block of 55th Street, suspicious incident. A Holmes Beach police officer checked a residence after finding a glass door open. Nothing appeared to be disturbed.

Oct. 5, 500 block of 70th Street, suspicious circumstance. An officer took a report at the HBPD from a complainant who said she placed her bicycle in the back yard and the next day noticed both tires were flat and appeared to have been slashed.

Oct. 5, 500 block of Key Royale Drive, open door. An officer arrived at an abandoned residence where there was an open door.

Oct. 6, 500 block of 67th Street, noise. An HBPD officer was dispatched in reference to a noise complaint. The officer arrived and several people were in a pool speaking loudly. The officer told the people to be quiet or go inside.

Oct. 6, 500 block of Key Royale Drive, house check. An officer showed up to a residence due to the house being on a house check list. While checking the house, the officer found a door open and the side garage window broken. Nothing appeared to have been missing. The owner was contacted and said he would have someone come secure the house.

Oct. 6, 200 block of 69th Street, assistance. An officer assisted a Longboat Key officer to check a residence, where two men were detained due to a possible criminal violation. The HBPD officer located the men, who were released on a burglary to a residence charge in Longboat Key.

Oct. 7, 3300 block of E. Bay Drive, theft. An officer was dispatched to West Marine in reference to the theft of two rod -and-reel combinations. The manager of the store said he was showing someone a fishing pole when another customer left the store, last seen heading north on East Bay Drive. The owner noticed he had two empty slots where the fishing poles were. He suspected the customer who left the store.

Obituaries – 10-13-2010

Grace F. Burgin

Grace F. Boswell Burgin, 89, of Bradenton, formerly of Clearwater and Pennsauken, N.J., died Oct. 2.

Ms. Burgin was a life member of the Delaware Gardens Volunteer Fire Company, Ladies Auxiliary in Pennsauken and attended Calvary Community Baptist Church in Pennsauken.
Services will be private. Memorial donations may be made to Tidewell Hospice & Palliative Care, 5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota FL 34238.

Survivors include sister Dorothy of Bradenton; daughter Sandra Tocco of Holmes Beach; sons Charles and wife Sue of Shamong, N.J., and Jeffrey and wife Donna of Pennsauken; seven grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

Larry Lee Cory

Larry Lee Cory, 73, of Sarasota, formerly of New Castle, Ind., Dayton, Ohio, and Port Charlotte, died Oct. 1, 2010.

Mr. Cory attended Ohio State University where he was drum major of the matching band in 1957 and 1958 and graduated from Wright State University. Military service included eight years in the U.S. Navy Reserves.

He married Jayne Engel in 1960 in Columbus. They lived in Dayton until moving to Port Charlotte in 1969 and eventually moved to Sarasota in 1995.

He was in condominium property management for 22 years in Fort Myers Beach and Sarasota. He was a JCI senator, a member of First United Methodist Church, and was active in Sarasota-Manatee OSU Alumni Club and Anna Maria Island Kiwanis Club.

Memorial donations may be made to Kiwanis Club of Anna Maria Island, marked “for the foundation,” P.O. Box 1215, Holmes Beach FL 34218, or Sarasota-Manatee OSU Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box 2368, Oneco FL 34264 or a charity of one’s choice.

A memorial celebration of life was held Oct. 8 at First United Methodist Church in Sarasota.

Survivors include his wife of 50 years, Mary Jayne; sisters Linda Slack of New Castle, Del., and Teri Tubbs of Port Charlotte; sister-in-law Jeanne Hardman; and many nieces and nephews.

Edwin H. Hunter

Edwin H. Hunter, 90, of Fernandina Beach, Fla., died Sept. 30.

Mr. Hunter was born in Petersburg, Va. He married Anne Seay in 1947 and they lived in Petersburg while Mr. Hunter worked in sales. In 1956, the family moved to the College Park area of Orlando, and in 1968 his family moved to Anna Maria Island. Mr. Hunter worked as billing manager with Tropicana. He eventually became a real estate broker with Holmes Beach Realty. He moved in 2000 to Fernandina Beach. He was a former member of the Episcopal Church of the Annunciation Church in Holmes Beach and St. Michael’s First Episcopal Church in Orlando. Mr. Hunter served in the U.S. Army as a first lieutenant.

Memorial contributions may be made to feed children throughout the world to the Reliv Kalogris Foundation in care of Virginia McCabe, 304 Village Place, Wexford, PA15090. Please note “Kalogris Foundation” on the check. Mr. Hunter will be laid to rest beside his wife at Church of the Annunciation. Condolences are welcome at   www.oxleyheard.com. Arrangements were by Oxley-Heard Funeral Home.

Mr. Hunter is survived by his children, Ed Jr. of Deer, Ariz., Arthur S. “Bo” Hunter of Bradenton, Andrew Meade Hunter of Palatka, Fla., and Virginia (Missy) and husband Scott McCabe of Wexford, Pa.; 10 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.