Tag Archives: 03-20-2019

Island mayors downshift paid beach parking

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Beachgoers walk to the Manatee Public Beach as motorists arrive to seek parking March 14 near the county-operated beach at 4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. Islander Photos: Lisa Neff
Eden Hoffelmeyer, 2, of Sparta, Illinois, waits in her car seat while her parents unload beach gear at the Manatee Public Beach in Holmes Beach. The Hoffelmeyer family was on holiday March 14 from Sparta, Illinois. Islander Photos: Lisa Neff
Isaac Hoffelmeyer, 5, of Sparta Illinois, waits for his parents David and Christina to unpack the family van March 14 at the Manatee Public Beach, 4000 Gulf Drive, Holmes Beach. The family, including Amelia, 7, and Eden, 2, was on a spring holiday. Another driver in a van from Ontario, loaded with people, is searching for parking.

Before they see the beach, many Manatee Public Beach visitors see brake lights and turn signals as they circle the parking lot seeking a parking space.

Might they also someday see parking meters at Manatee County beaches, as well as at boat ramps?

The concept of paid-beach parking resurfaced in late February during a preliminary budget discussion among county commissioners.

At the meeting, Manatee County Commissioner Stephen Jonsson, whose district includes west Manatee, Anna Maria Island and north Longboat Key, observed Pinellas County beaches have paid-parking and that user fees can help pay for amenities.

“I am just supporting research to determine what the feasibility may be and what consequences might also develop,” Jonsson said in a statement March 14 to The Islander.

Island mayors, assembled March 11 at Anna Maria City Hall for an Island Transportation Planning Organization meeting, said they have an idea the consequences would be negative.

The ITPO consists of the island mayors and generally assembles before a meeting of the Sarasota/Manatee Metropolitan Planning Organization, which includes an island mayor. The next MPO meeting will be at 9:30 a.m. Monday, March 25, at the Holiday Inn Sarasota Bradenton International Airport, 8009 15th St. E., Sarasota.

At the ITPO meeting, Holmes Beach Mayor Judy Titsworth expressed concern that the county commission may consider instituting paid parking at its beaches.

“I think that’s going to impact everybody,” said Anna Maria Mayor Dan Murphy.

In Anna Maria, the county maintains Bayfront Park on the bayside, but the city owns the property.

In Holmes Beach, the county owns and maintains the Manatee Public Beach on the Gulf of Mexico and also operates the city-owned Kingfish Boat Ramp on Manatee Avenue.

In Bradenton Beach, the county owns and maintains the Cortez and Coquina beaches, as well as the Leffis Key preserve and boat ramps on the bayside of the park.

Bradenton Beach Mayor John Chappie observed, “One-third of our city is county property.”

“It would have a traumatic effect on our neighborhoods,” Chappie said of paid parking at the beaches. “I was surprised when they came up with it all of a sudden.”

Titsworth replied, “And they’re talking about the boat ramps, too.”

At the Kingfish ramp March 14, Johan Rodriguez of Palmetto was putting his boat into the water.

Asked whether he’d pay to park at the ramp, Rodriguez said, “Don’t we already pay for this with our taxes?”

At the Manatee Public Beach, Martha Wilcox, a seasonal resident from Vermont, said she wouldn’t balk at paying for parking, provided parking was made more abundant.

“I don’t want to be asked to pay $10 an hour after driving around 30 minutes looking for a parking space,” she said. “If you are going to sell parking, you better have it to sell.”

Eight out of 10 beachgoers polled by The Islander said they wouldn’t mind paying to park at the public beach if the fee were modest and space abundant.

And yet, said Donna Snyder, who was visiting the island from Kansas City, Missouri, “If we knew of free parking, we’d probably use it.”

Titsworth, at the ITPO meeting, surmised that charging for parking at Manatee Public Beach would push people to search for free parking in residential neighborhoods or encourage them to poach spaces at nearby businesses, specifically the Public Super Market on East Bay Drive.

Murphy said Anna Maria officials studied paid parking for the city and found “it doesn’t have any payback.”

Chappie said he would invite a county commissioner to attend the next Coalition of Barrier Island Elected Officials meeting — possibly in April — to discuss the matter.

Jonsson, to The Islander, said the next step might be a work session.

“I have absolutely no idea what revenues could be generated,” he stated, but revenue generated could be used to maintain the beaches and also encourage other modes of transportation to and on the island.

Near the meeting’s conclusion, Murphy observed it was the last session of the ITPO in Anna Maria for four years. The chair will shift to Chappie, and the meetings will take place at Bradenton Beach City Hall, 107 Gulf Drive, beginning at 2 p.m. Monday, May 6.

 

Parking consultant study suggests paid parking
For the ongoing Barrier Islands Traffic Study, a Tampa consulting firm evaluated parking on the islands in Manatee and Sarasota counties and offered a series of recommendations, including paid parking in key public areas.

The study by Walker Consultants, presented last April, listed eight general recommendations for the study area, including charging “a fee to park in the most convenient public parking locations” because “implementing a fee-to-park strategy will support a best-practice policy for managing demand by price. The goal would be to make at least 15 percent of the localized parking inventory available for use at all times by creating parking turnover and encouraging alternative transit and commuter options.”

Another recommendation was to use parking revenues to lease park-and-ride locations.

A third recommendation was to use parking revenues to support bonds to build structured public parking “convenient to public-use areas and commercial corridors.”

Specific to Anna Maria Island, the report recommended working with local churches to use parking lots, developing an electronic wayfinding system so motorists can find parking spaces, establishing park-and-ride locations on the mainland, and, in Holmes Beach and Bradenton Beach, charging “a fee to park at designated public beach parking spaces.”

AM city pier pile-driving progresses, decking ‘on deck’

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Cheryl Southerly, visiting from Bradenton, looks out over the water March 16 where piles are being driven for the new Anna Maria City Pier. Islander Photo: Ryan Paice

Work installing walkway pilings for the new Anna Maria City Pier continues.

Anna Maria Mayor Dan Murphy, at a city commission meeting March 14, said i+iconSOUTHEAST workers were driving 15 walkway pilings near the T-end the same day. The section is planned to serve as a landing area for small watercraft and is beefed up to include three pilings per row, while the remainder of the walkway will have two pilings per row.

Murphy said pile-driving for the boat landing would wrap up March 25, when Icon will start driving 126 walkway pilings near the shore side, moving east.

The 141 walkway pilings make up almost three quarters of the 201 pilings planned for the 776-foot pier, and should be driven and leveled by April 26, according to the mayor.

He said Icon would use a second barge to deliver pilings to the construction site to avoid interrupting work.

Next on deck, after the pile-driving, Icon will place the concrete deck on the T-end and install wood bents to support the walkway. Murphy said materials would again be brought by a barge to the site.

He said the city purchase of decking materials will save $30,000 in taxes that would have been charged if Icon made the purchase.

Murphy said he would have the purchase order for the ipe wood, as well as any potential change orders on the construction, ready for commission consideration by March 18.

City commissioners will vote during an emergency meeting at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, March 21.

Also, Murphy said 20 small pilings that were added along the shore to hold fencing during the demolition of the pier, would be removed “some time in the future.”

The city’s contract with Icon requires the contractor to complete the walkway and T-end by Aug. 26 or pay a $975 penalty for every workday after the deadline.

Murphy also said he scheduled a meeting with pier tenant Mario Schoenfelder for April 10 to update him on the project.

The city has yet to discuss a request for proposals to construct the restaurant and bait shop at the T-end.

2018 red tide outbreak — not Mother Nature’s doing

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Linda Jones receives the Suncoast Waterkeeper Environmental Achievement Award March 3, recognizing decades of activism and opposition to phosphate mining and inappropriate development. Jones led the Manatee-Sarasota Sierra Club in opposition to Long Bar Pointe.
The blue line on the graph represents an average of 10 years of FWC data from years before Florida’s development boom, depicting red tide as it may have been historically, when the Conquistadors arrived and began keeping records. The red line represents more recent averages of FWC data. A line for 2010-19 would be off the graph. Islander Graphic: Larry Brand
A microscopic-size cell of Karenia brevis, the species responsible for red tide. Islander Courtesy Photo

By Andy Mele, Special to The Islander

As 150 guests at the Suncoast Waterkeeper Brunch for the Bay learned March 3, the red tide bloom in 2018 was not a natural occurrence.

The determining factor in today’s red tides, after all variables are accounted for, is human-induced nutrient pollution — primarily nitrates and phosphates. Nutrients are not merely a marginal contributor, as some institutions and elected officials would like us to believe.

True, Karenia brevis, the toxic alga that populates the lethal blooms we call red tide is a naturally occurring organism. It is found in waters around the globe.

And, yes, red tides have been documented since the arrival of Europeans to Florida’s shore. But there is a difference between the naturally occurring red tides and the rapidly growing red tides we have endured for decades.

About Karenia brevis
Karenia brevis is also known as red tide when its numbers become higher than 1,000 cells per liter. K.brevis emits brevetoxins that can become airborne in water spray and wind. At concentrations above 10,000 cells/liter, red tide can cause respiratory symptoms in humans. Above 50,000 cells per liter, fish mortality begins to occur. Above 1,000,000 cells/liter, discoloration of the water can be seen. Concentrations as high as 50,000,000 cells/liter were observed during the 2018 red tide event.

Larry Brand, Ph.D. and a research scientist at the University of Miami, was the featured speaker at Suncoast Waterkeeper’s annual brunch at the Bradenton Yacht Club in Palmetto.

Brand told his audience there is a fifteenfold increase in K. brevis concentrations that is contributing to today’s mega-blooms. After accounting for geological and geographical contributions to red tide, Brand said, “The only remaining variable that has increased enough to account for it is us.”

Brand explained some of the complexities of Florida’s red tide. Plants — and algae are plants — require 16 parts nitrogen to one part phosphorus. Where that 16N:1P ratio is found, there can be a natural red tide bloom.

The waters on the East Coast of Florida — where the St. Lucie Canal empties Lake Okeechobee discharges thick with toxic blue-green algae — are dominated by limestone deposits and are naturally rich in nitrogen. Hence, phosphorus is required to provide the optimum 16:1 nutrient that drives algal growth. No phosphorus, no algae. Phosphorus is relatively scarce on the East Coast.

On the southwest Gulf Coast, however, the opposite circumstances prevail. Because of massive natural phosphate formations underlying west-central Florida and in the Gulf of Mexico, the coastal waters are rich in phosphorus from a variety of inputs, including phosphate mine drainage. Here, algae need nitrogen to stimulate growth. No nitrogen, no algae. It’s called “nitrogen-limited.”

However, when Lake Okeechobee’s nitrogen-rich blue-green algae enters the system from the Caloosahatchee River, the conditions for explosive growth are met.

Brand lists four principal sources of nitrogen: animal waste, crop fertilizer, stormwater runoff and illegal sewage discharges. All have increased exponentially since the 1950s along with Florida’s population and development, when the first sample run was conducted by FWC. In the 1950s, less than 10 percent of the Florida coastline was developed, while the remainder was woodlands, grasslands and wetlands. Today, more than 90 percent is developed and we’re flushing pollutants into the bays and Gulf.

Agricultural sources — animal waste and fertilizer — are the major causes of intense algal blooms in Lake Okeechobee. They are transported down the Kissimmee River, and pumped north from sugar cane fields south of the lake. The other two sources — stormwater and sewage — supply a steady diet of nutrients for red tide as it expands up and down the Gulf Coast.

Aside from people with respiratory symptoms who may suffer chronic asthma or COPD, the effects of K. brevis are immediately noticeable, leading people to leave the area, although no long-term or acute effects are known. The only known human fatalities associated with red tide have been from shellfish poisoning. Shellfish filter water through their gills to extract food and oxygen and, as K. brevis cells accumulate in shellfish, they can be fatal if eaten.

Blue-green algae, on the other hand, which is consumed by fish and shellfish, are suspected of having long-term impacts, specifically ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, without short-term impacts to warn of exposure. The correlations between algae and disease are still being studied, but an environmental toxin, beta-methylamino-L-alanine or BMAA, is found in both victims of the diseases and the blue-green algae.

BMAA appears to provide a causative link.

And BMAA has been documented in almost all shrimp and species of fish from the areas of the red tide bloom.

As a general caution, Brand suggested not consuming any seafood from areas impacted by red tide for several months after the event has subsided.

Data sets for 1954-63 are regarded as baseline “naturally-occurring” red tide, approximately what Hernando de Soto or Ponce de Leon might have seen in the 1500s — neither a threat to tourism nor an apocalyptic killer of fish and marine mammals.

But today’s conditions are both, according to Brand, and it’s worsening.

The ozonators, bubblers and clay sprinklers being touted by Mote Marine Laboratory and some elected officials as fixes are unproven, wildly expensive and cannot be scaled up to levels needed to treat the coastline. Brand says they appear to be strategies for developing revenue from wealthy canal homeowners, and cannot be taken seriously as solutions to red tide.

He said it, and Suncoast Waterkeeper has been saying it since last summer: the only practical, meaningful and affordable solution is to stop the nutrient pollution at its source. And its true source is not at a dairy farm or a sugar cane field. It is in Tallahassee.

Here’s the Waterkeeper solution to red tide.

Florida urgently needs:
• Numeric, enforceable water quality standards and the FDEP staff and budget to enforce them.
• Common-sense limits on development.
• No more phosphate mining.
• Elected officials who understand that as the water goes, so goes Florida.
• A comprehensive water and aquifer management program, including conservation measures, pricing and limits.

Brand and Suncoast Waterkeeper maintain that without action and change, there is little chance for improvement and there’s a strong prospect the state’s water crisis will worsen.

Andy Mele, of Suncoast Waterkeeper, is an advocate for a better environment and responsible development in Manatee County. He is former executive director of a major Hudson River environmental group that was instrumental in forcing General Electric to remove 300,000 pounds of toxic PCBs from the river. He authored “Polluting for Pleasure,” the book that rendered two-stroke outboard motors all but extinct, keeping millions of gallons of oil and gasoline from U.S. waterways every year. He can be reached at andymele@mac.com.

Clearing the shore

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Chris Carr, Dee Recicar and Phyllis Digabriel clean up the beach near the Anna Maria Island Moose Lodge, 110 Gulf Drive S., Bradenton Beach, during a countywide cleanup March 16. Additional cleanups took place at Coquina Beach in Bradenton Beach, the Kingfish Boat Ramp in Holmes Beach, areas near Anna Maria City Hall, the FISH Preserve in Cortez and on adopted highways and shorelines. The cleanup was in partnership with Keep Manatee Beautiful. For cleanup results and more photos, check The Islander’s March 27 issue. Islander Courtesy Photo

St Patricks Parade 2019

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Sean Murphy, Beach Bistro restaurant owner and parade organizer, surveys the lineup March 17 for the 20th annual Beach Bistro St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Islander Photos: ChrisAnn Silver Esformes
A green-haired leprechaun shares a gift with a wee girl March 20 during the 20th annual Beach Bistro St. Patrick’s Day Parade.
Members of the Rowlett Middle Academy marching band of Bradenton perform March 20 in the annual Beach Bistro St. Patrick’s Day parade in Holmes Beach.
Lion and Rampant Pipe and Drum of Sarasota brought members of all ages, including a wee small drummer, to perform in the March 20 Beach Bistro St. Patrick’s Day.
The Anna Maria Island Privateers scurry and throw beads to the crowd from the Skullywag boat/float as they pass along Marina Drive in Holmes Beach March 20 in the 20th annual Beach Bistro St. Patrick’s Day Parade.
Members of the Crewe of De Soto of Bradenton hand out beads and high-five attendees at the 20th annual Beach Bistro St. Patrick’s Day parade in Holmes Beach.
A pair of llamas — labeled baby camels for fun — are led March 20 along Marina Drive in Holmes Beach in the annual processional for St. Patrick’s Day.
Riders on the Anna Maria Island Privateers float, the Skullywag, soak up the shenanigans March 20 during the annual Beach Bistro St. Patrick’s Day Parade.
Bagpipers play and march in the annual Beach Bistro St. Patrick’s Day Parade.
Photographer, Karen-Riley Love
Photographer, Karen-Riley Love
Photographer, Karen-Riley Love
Photographer, Karen-Riley Love
Photographer, Karen-Riley Love
Photographer, Karen-Riley Love
Photographer, Karen-Riley Love
Photographer, Karen-Riley Love

First phase of Pine Avenue improvements previewed

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Anna Maria commissioners heard results of a Pine Avenue vehicle traffic and pedestrian safety study from public works manager Dean Jones, during a March 14 meeting. Jones completed is research on the 200 and 300 blocks of Pine Avenue. Islander Courtesy Photo: CofAM

Pedestrian safety, traffic and parking are long-established problems for Pine Avenue in Anna Maria.

Public works manager Dean Jones, who was tasked by the city commission to suggest improvements block-by-block, presented his findings for the 200 and 300 blocks to city commissioners March 14.

Jones said he spent a week studying the avenue in-person, noting where people crossed Pine, identifying hot spots for potential problems and spacing for more parking. He said he conferred with Mayor Dan Murphy about his suggestions and made some changes before his presentation.

Murphy prefaced Jones’ presentation by stating the improvements are not final solutions, but rather short-term ideas for Pine Avenue. He added that the city would use contingency funds for any fixes.

For the 200 block, Jones proposed adding a high-intensity crosswalk near the trolley stop west of the Donut Experiment at 210C Pine Ave., as well as at the crosswalk on Pine Avenue on the south side of the intersection with North Shore Drive.

Jones also proposed crosswalk markings across North Shore at the intersection.

Currently, there are crosswalks on the north and east sides of the intersection, but Jones said he witnessed people disregarding them to walk across the other sides of the street.

Also, he suggested converting a “no parking area” on the south side of Pine across from the Donut Experiment to a loading zone to be used for deliveries to nearby shops.

Commissioner Doug Copeland said the conversion was a good idea, but suggested loading zone hours so the area also could be used for public parking — probably three spaces.

Jones said he would measure the area and return to the commission with suggestions for parking that would not impede access at the nearby trolley stop.

For the 300 block, Jones proposed adding high-intensity crosswalks on the south and west sides of the intersection at Crescent Drive and Pine — which he called unsafe for pedestrians — as well as a double-line crosswalk on the south side of Pine.

Currently, a high-intensity crosswalk is on the north side of the intersection, with a double-line crosswalk on the east side.

He also proposed a double-line crosswalk across the north side of the T-intersection at Los Cedros Drive and Pine, where no crosswalk currently exists.

Copeland asked Manatee County Sheriff’s Sgt. Mike Jones how he’d to encourage crosswalk use because he’s seen people cross Pine outside of crosswalks.

Jones said the city could launch a campaign encouraging crosswalk use or ticket offenders. Jaywalking in Anna Maria is a noncriminal infraction, punishable by a civil penalty not to exceed $500 as determined by a judge or special magistrate.

Seymour suggested a public-safety day, when deputies would be stationed along the avenue to encourage crosswalk use, as well as ticket jaywalkers.

Jones said the next step would be to establish the cost — estimated at $10,000 — and gain commission approval for the improvements. The city would next issue a request for proposals to contractors.

Jones said he would finalize his proposal for the two blocks by the next commission meeting at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 28.

“At some point, something is going to happen, and we have to do something about it,” Jones said.

Holmes Beach charter reviewers delve into residency, rights

Holmes Beach charter review commissioners are considering proposed ballot measures for charter changes.

The CRC voted 3-2 March 14 to place on the ballot a proposed extension of the length of residency to qualify to run for city office from two years to four years.

However, because the decision was not approved by a supermajority, which requires a 4-1 vote, the motion failed.

Charter Review Commission chair Edward Upshaw and members David Zaccagnino and Sean Murphy voted “yay,” while Claudia Carlson and Nancy Deal voted “nay.”

Murphy, an islander for 40 years, argued that people who have lived in Holmes Beach for more than four years have a better understanding of the city than those who recently moved to the city and “think they can save it.”

“Maybe we would get a more educated electorate and educated commission if we extend the residency requirement,” he said.

Deal disagreed with Murphy.

She said she knows old-timers who have no interest in island issues, while some seasonal or new residents become more active in the community.

Carlson said newcomers can provide fresh perspectives on longstanding issues, such as transportation.

Murphy also suggested that increasing the stipend for commissioners — currently $500 per month — might encourage more people to run.

He said many residents cannot afford to work 25-40 hours per week “for virtually nothing.”

“I doubt anyone is going to run for the money, but we might generate more candidates if they felt their expenses were going to be more realistically treated,” he said.

Zaccagnino noted payment to commissioners is not in the charter, and suggested the CRC recommend to the city commission that, if they raise the stipend they could increase the candidate pool.

Murphy motioned that the CRC create an addendum for the city commission, which would include the board’s remarks on topics outside of the charter recommendations, including increased compensation for the mayor and commissioners.

The motion passed 4-1, with Carlson voting “nay.”

Additionally, Murphy suggested including a “bill of rights” in the charter, which would state that residents have a “preeminent right to timely treatment of applications for permits and licenses. They also have a right to timely and direct access to their elected officials.”

He recommended that residents’ permit applications take priority over those of investors who do not live in the city.

Carlson said she understands Murphy’s point of view, but she suggested they check with the city attorney to determine if the charter is the appropriate place for such a document.

Upshaw suggested Murphy write up his proposal and file it with the city clerk.

The CRC comprises five people elected by citywide vote in 2018.

It has met weekly since Jan. 17 to review the charter for possible changes.

The committee has a May 8 deadline to present recommendations to the city commission.

Charter changes approved by a supermajority of the committee will be submitted to the city commission as an ordinance, and then to the Manatee County Supervision of Elections for a citywide vote on the November ballot.

City attorney Patricia Petruff said she would prepare and review the ordinance for the ballot.

The Holmes Beach CRC meets at 10 a.m. Thursdays through the end of April at city hall, 5801 Marina Drive.

 

Commissioner offers feedback to charter reviewers
The Holmes Beach charter review commission solicited feedback from the city commission for its March 14 meeting.

Commissioner Kim Rash, who is serving his first term as an elected official, was the only commissioner to attend.

CRC chair Edward Upshaw said he might not have given other commissioners enough notice and he plans to extend an invitation to attend the March 21 review meeting.

Members of the CRC asked Rash about topics they are considering, including the form of government.

Charter review commissioner David Zaccagnino said Rash campaigned on the platform of changing the form of government from strong-mayor to city manager and asked why Rash, whose platform was “the voice of the people,” advocates the change.

Rash said he isn’t for or against a city manager, but previously stated it should be “up to the people to decide,” as a ballot measure.

“I could go either way on it, but I think the residents ought to be the ones to decide,” Rash said. “Something that important should not be decided by five people.”

The Islander Classifieds: Wednesday, March 20, 2019

ITEMS FOR SALE

TWO SLEEPER SOFAS: Two years old. Garage motor. $50 each. Karl, 941-704-7798. dieter.kurz@bluewin.ch.

COMPUTER: DELL, WINDOWS 10, refurbished, $70. 941-756-6728.

ANTIQUE PARTNER DESK: All wood, $1,000. See at The Islander office, 3218 E. Bay Drive, Holmes Beach. 941-778-7978.

FOUR OAK OFFICE chairs: Antiques, perfect for eclectic dining set. The Islander newspaper, 3218 E. Bay Drive, Holmes Beach. 941-778-7978.

FREEBIE ITEMS FOR SALE
Individuals may place one free ad with up to three items, each priced $100 or less, 15 words or less. FREE, one week, must be submitted online. Email classifieds@islander.org, fax toll-free 1-866-362-9821. (limited time offer)

ANNOUNCEMENTS

HIT AND RUN: On Monday, Feb. 18 (President’s Day) my son was hit by a Mercedes SUV at the corner of Gulf Drive. and Pine Avenue in Anna Maria at about 1:30 p.m. Thankfully, he escaped serious injury. If anyone witnessed or knows anything about this incident, I would be grateful if they contacted the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office and refer to case #2019004679. Thank you, Charles Cowin.

WANTED: WORKOUT DVDs and retired but working XBox, Wii units with games for Ministry of Presence for kids and teens in Haiti. Deliver to The Islander, 3218 E. Bay Drive, Holmes Beach.

WANTED: YOUR OLD cellphone for recycling. Deliver to The Islander, 3218 E. Bay Drive, Holmes Beach.

AERIAL PHOTOS of Anna Maria Island. View and purchase onli ne: www.jackelka.com.

FREE GUN LOCK courtesy of Project Childsafe, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and Holmes Beach Police Department. Pick up at The Islander office, 3218 E. Bay Drive, Holmes Beach. Don’t be sorry, be safe.

GARAGE SALES

ROSER THRIFT SHOP and annex open 9:30 a.m.- 2 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday. Donations preferred 9 a.m.-11 a.m., Wednesdays. 511 Pine Ave., Anna Maria. Call 941-779-2733.

PETS

WANTED! FOSTERS, VOLUNTEERS to help Moonracer No Kill Animal Rescue. Please email: moonraceranimalrescue@gmail.com.

BOATS & BOATING

BIMINI BAY SAILING: Small sailboat rentals and instruction. Day. Week. Month. Sunfish, Laser, Windrider 17 and Precision 15. Call Brian at 941-685-1400.

PONTOON BOAT RENTAL Create life long memories. Call 941-778-2121 or see boatflorida.net.

GRADY WHITE 228 Yamaha 200, four-stroke. $28,900. 941-761-8761.

FISHING

FISHLIKEUS.com provides fishing lessons and kayak charters in southwest Florida. Contact 360-797-3269 or reservations@fishlikeus.com.

HELP WANTED

HOUSEKEEPER: PART-TIME at Haley’s Motel. Must have own transportation and speak English. Prior experience required. Haley’s is a non-smoking property. 941-778-5405.

REPORTER WANTED: Full- to part-time. Print media, newspaper experience required. Apply via email with letter of interest to news@islander.org.

KIDS FOR HIRE

KIDS FOR HIRE ads are FREE for up to three weeks for Island youths under 16 looking for work. Ads must be placed in person at The Islander office, 3218 E. Bay Drive, Holmes Beach.

HEALTH CARE

CARING, COMPASSIONATE REGISTERED CNA, 10 years experience. Guisela, 941-685-2329.

SERVICES

ISLAND COMPUTER GUY, 37 years experience. On-site PC repairs, upgrades, buying assistance and training. Call Bill, 941-778-2535.

CLEANING: RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL, vacation, construction, rentals and power washing. 941-744-7983.

U FLY I drive your car anywhere in the USA. Airport runs, anywhere. Office, 941-447-6389. 941-545-6688.

I DON’T CUT corners, I clean corners. Professional, friendly cleaning service since 1999. 941-779-6638. Leave message.

NEED A RIDE to airports? Tampa $65, St. Pete, $55, Sarasota, $30. Gary, 863-409-5875. gvoness80@gmail.com.

B-SAFE-RIDES: Peggy, R.N I live on Anna Maria Island. Airport, 1-6 seats and personal rides, errands, etc. Don’t risk it! Call now, 727-902-7784.

MYFOODLADY.com provides nutritional guidance for general and chronic health conditions. Contact 360-797-3275 or reservations@myfoodlady.com.

PSYCHIC TAROT READINGS with Renata, an Eastern-European advisor. Predict and learn with me! Honesty, integrity and humor. Afternoon and evening hours. Text/call for appointment. 941-840-9359.

HOME TWEET HOME: Organizing services. Spring specials! Like us on Facebook. 941-301-8017.  Bonnie@hthorganizing.com.

BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS JD’s Window Cleaning looking for storefront jobs in Holmes Beach. I make dirty windows sparkling clean. 941-920-3840.

BEACH SERVICE air conditioning, heat, refrigeration. Commercial and residential service, repair and/or replacement. Serving Manatee County and the Island since 1987. For dependable, honest and personalized service, call Bill Eller, 941-795-7411. CAC184228.

ANYONE CAN TAKE a picture. A professional creates a portrait. I want to be at your wedding! www.jackelka.com. 941-778-2711.

RELAXING MASSAGE IN the convenience of your home or hotel. Massage by Nadia, more than 20 years on Anna Maria Island. Call today for an appointment, 941-518-8301. MA#0017550.MA#0017550.

LAWN & GARDEN

CONNIE’S LANDSCAPING INC. Residential and commercial. Full-service lawn maintenance, landscaping, cleanups, hauling and more! Insured. 941-778-5294.

ISLAND LAWN SPRINKLER Service: Repairs, installs. Your local sprinkler company since 1997. Call Jeff, 941-778-2581.

SHELL DELIVERED AND spread. $55/yard. Hauling all kinds of gravel, mulch, top soil with free estimates. Call Larry at 941-795-7775, “shell phone” 941-720-0770.

NATURE’S DESIGN LANDSCAPING. Design and installation. Tropical landscape specialist. Residential and commercial. 35 years experience. 941-448-6336.

STRAIGHT SHOT LANDSCAPE: Shell, lime rock, palms, river rock, construction demolition, fencing, pressure washing, hauling debris and transport. Shark Mark, 941-301-6067.

HOME IMPROVEMENT

VAN-GO PAINTING residential/commercial, interior/exterior, pressure cleaning, wallpaper. Island references. Bill, 941-795-5100. www.vangopainting.net.

CUSTOM REMODELING EXPERT. All phases of carpentry, repairs and painting. Insured. Meticulous, clean, sober and prompt. Paul Beauregard, 941-730-7479.

TILE -TILE -TILE. All variations of ceramic tile supplied and installed. Quality workmanship, prompt, reliable, many Island references. Call Neil, 941-726-3077.

GRIFFIN’S HOME IMPROVEMENTS Inc. Handyman, fine woodwork, countertops, cabinets and wood flooring. Insured and licensed. 941-722-8792.

JERRY’S HOME REPAIR: Carpentry, handyman, light hauling, pressure washing. Jack of all trades. Call 941-447-2198.

ARTISAN DESIGN TILE and Marble. Building our reputation on excellent service and focused craftsmanship, one job at a time. www.ArtisanDesignTileAndMarble.com. Call Don, 941-993-6567.

SOUTHWEST HOME IMPROVEMENT: Michigan builder, quality work guaranteed. Affordable, timely, within budget. Call Mike, 1-616-204-8822.

R. A. GONZALEZ CONSTRUCTION: Re-roof and leak specialist. Residential/hotels/commercial. Repairs, shingles, tile, metal, flat. Quick response. Quality work at reasonable rates. References. Insured/licensed. #CCC1330056. Call Bryan at 727-277-9502.

BOB THE PAINTER: Relocated with 35 years painting, faux, wallpapering, drywall. Reliable. Free estimates. 419-265-3950.

I CAN FIX that! No job too small. 20 years experience. Remodel, new construction. Call Brent, 941-524-6965.

RENTALS

JUST OFF THE Island: Two retail storefronts for lease on Cortez Road. High visibility, high traffic. Water included. 7818 Cortez Road, approx 800 sf, 7834 Cortez Road, approximately 1,600 sf. 941-746-8666.

VACATION RENTAL: BEAUTIFUL one-bedroom condo. Pool, one block to beach, cable, Wi-Fi. Available January-March, $3,000/month. 941-778-1915.

ANNUAL RENTAL ON AMI: WE make Island living carefree! Weekly cleaning service, pool and yard maintenance included. 2BR/2BA remodeled duplex with motel amenities. Private pool with Jacuzzi. Fully furnished. Available May 5. $4,000/month. Tom, 941-993-4909.

SMALL OFFICE SPACE for rent; approx. 150 sf. $600/month, $500 deposit. 5386 Gulf Drive, Suite 101. 941-746-8666.

HOLMES BEACH: 2BR/2BA condo. Gorgeous bay views. See: FloridaRentalbyOwners.com. #1106. 207-944-6097.

AVAILABLE RENTAL: APRIL 2019 and October-April 2020. 2BR/2BA ground-level with carport and patio. Charming, plantation shutters. 1.5 blocks to Gulf beaches. Updated, granite countertops, recessed lighting, flat-screen TVs in each room. Must see! Anna Maria. 941-565-2373.

ANNUAL RENTAL: 2BR/2BA, Bradenton Beach. Covered parking and storage, two blocks to the beach. Available March 5. Call 925-596-0785.

LOOKING FOR: ANNA Maria Island house to rent, prefer 2BR, consider other. Nov. 10-Dec. 1. Must have room in driveway for a 20-foot Bass boat. Jeannene, 608-206-6250.

HOLMES BEACH: 2BR/2BA condo. Gorgeous bay views. See: FloridaRentalbyOwners.com. #1106. 207-944-6097.

OFF-SEASON STARTING May 15. Perico Bay 2BR/2BA, one-car garage. Updated villa. Book now. $1,500/month. Flexible. Real Estate Mart, 941-356-1456.

ANNUAL: 4BR/2BA WITH exercise room, pool, garage, walk to beach, good location. $2,500/month. 703-587-4675.

ANNUAL: GULF VIEW, few steps to beach. 2BR/2BA with den, sunroom, deck, garage. Good location. $2,500/month. 793-587-4675.

HOLMES BEACH DUPLEX: 2BR/2BA beautifully furnished, garage included. No pets, no smoking. 6-8 months. $1,750/month. 941-778-2824.

HOLMES BEACH: Westbay Point and Moorings. 2BR/2BA condo. Furnished, best bay views. 6-8months. No smoking. $2,150/month. 941-778-2824.

SIX-MONTH SEASONAL rental for 2020. 2BR/2BA cottage located on Gulf side at north end of Anna Maria. Five houses from the beach. $3,200/month. 941-741-6729.

2BR/2BA CONDO: FURNISHED annual rental. Holmes Beach.
Westbay Point and Moorings. Bottom floor, waterfront, upgraded. $1,800/month plus electric, cable/internet. Contact 813-362-5881. mgiudice@me.com.

HOLMES BEACH STUDIO rental. Available Dec. 15-April 15, 2019-2020. $1,750/month. 908-914-1182.

REAL ESTATE

STARTING FROM THE low $300,000s. Only minutes from the beach, this new active adult community is perfectly located just south of Manatee Avenue off Village Green Parkway. Perfectly designed, open 2BR or 3BR/2BA plus den and two-car garage floor plans. Luxurious amenities, pool, spa, gym, pickleball and fenced-in dog park. HOA only $209/month. Models open daily. Contact us, 941-254-3330. www.MirabellaFlorida.com.

MOBILE HOME FOR sale (55-plus Sandpiper Resort Co-op). 50 steps from the beach. 1BR/1BA, fully furnished, new floors. $75,000. Call Erik, 813-679-3561.

ANNA MARIA ISLAND: Sweet spot. Waterfront 3BR/2BA home. Caged, heated pool and spa. Boat lift and dock. Vaulted ceiling. New, low price, $699,900. Exclusive, Real Estate Mart, 941-356-1456.

AFFORDABLE DOUBLEWIDE: HANDYMAN. $29,000 or best offer. Nine miles to beach. Ask for JB, Real Estate Mart, 941-356-1456.

BAYSHORE GARDENS HOME: 3BR/2BA, community pool and marina. Very affordable at $179,900. Real Estate Mart, 941-356-1456.

BEACH BLOCK! TURNKEY furnished beautifully updated 3BR/2BA classic cottage with pool, only five houses to beach! West of Gulf Drive with great rental. Only $899,000. Call Kathleen White at 941-773-0165. Island Real Estate.

CONFORMING DUPLEX! Over 2,500 sf of living with 2BR/2BA and 2BR/1BA. Easy walk to beach and room for pool! Now only $699,900. Call Kathleen White at 941-773-0165. Island Real Estate. KWhite35@tampabay.rr.com.

Streetlife – 03-20-2019

Anna Maria

March 5, Bayfront Park, 300 N. Bay Blvd., confiscated property. Manatee County sheriff’s deputies observed marijuana smoke spewing from a parked vehicle. On approaching the vehicle, the officer found two occupants with 12 bottles of beer, a bottle of rum, marijuana, a marijuana grinder and a pipe. The deputies determined they were University of Florida students and called their parents. The deputies dumped out the alcohol and placed other items into evidence for destruction.

Anna Maria is policed by the MCSO.

Bradenton Beach

March 9, Coquina Beach Park, 1600 Gulf Drive S., driver’s license. A Bradenton Beach police officer saw a man in an SUV pull out from the Coquina Beach parking lot into slow-moving northbound traffic. He passed about 20 cars at a high rate of speed. The officer stopped the man for speeding and determined he was driving on a suspended license. The man was arrested and transported to the Manatee County jail and a family member with a valid license removed the vehicle.

March 11, Summer Sands condominium, 1009 Gulf Drive N., vehicle burglary. A man from Ontario, Canada, reported his wallet containing credit cards and identification was stolen from his unlocked vehicle at the condo parking area.

March 9-12, 100 block of 25th Street North, stolen/recovered property. Two unlocked bicycles were reported stolen and later found behind Shell Land, 301 Gulf Drive N., and returned to the owner.

Bradenton Beach is policed by BBPD.

Cortez

No reports.

Cortez is policed by the MCSO.

Holmes Beach

March 5, 700 Key Royale Drive, Key Royale Club, trespass. An officer was called after two males and two females were seen parking in the lot and entering the golf course with fishing poles. The four received trespass warnings and left the area.

March 7, 700 block of Manatee Avenue, traffic, drug citation. An officer traveling east on Manatee Avenue observed a car drifting into the oncoming lane. After stopping the car, the officer observed a green leafy substance in the driver’s lap and the odor of can- nabis. During a search of the vehicle, the officer located more leafy substance in a container, a digital scale and a cannabis grinder. The substance tested positive for marijuana. The driver was issued a citation for possession of less than 20 grams and for paraphernalia. The cannabis, scale and grinder were entered into the HBPD evidence locker.

March 8, 600 block of Baronet Lane, identity theft. A woman reported two $9,500 bank withdrawals from her bank account. She reported the thief used a Florida driver’s license she had reported stolen in 2013.

March 9, 5300 block of Gulf Drive, driver’s license, drug citation. An officer stopped a vehicle observed traveling southbound on Marina Drive with the driver’s side headlight out. A smell of marijuana was observed and a search located 0.8 gram of can- nabis. The driver was cited for no valid license and for less than 20 grams of marijuana. He was issued a summons and released. A juvenile with him was picked up by a family member.

March 10, 100 block of 73rd Street, theft. An officer responding to a call of suspicious activity at the Coconuts condominiums was contacted by a man who said his fishing poles were taken from his deck. Three Akuna rod and reels valued at $475 and a 7-foot Shumino rig valued at $125 were reported stolen.

March 10, 200 block of 68th Street, noise vio- lation. Officers responded to a noise complaint at a rental and found teenagers jumping from a roof into a swimming pool. The rental agents were called. Alcohol was located in the house. Four of the 12 people were over 21 years old. All were evicted from the property for occupancy violation, noise violation, safety issues, underage drinking and violating the terms of the rental agreement. Officers remained while the renters gath- ered their possessions and left.

Holmes Beach is policed by HBPD.

Streetlife is based on incident reports and narra- tives from the BBpd, HBpd and mcSo.

Reporter Sandy ambrogi contributed to this report.